Buyers' advice, high tech, industry, Motoring News, vehicle security

Software updates vital to avoid theft-by-hacking

LONDON, England – Motorists vehicle owners in the UK are being advised to keep their vehicle(s) software up-to-date with manufacturers’ recalls to protect themselves from the rising trend of key-code hacking.

The advice comes from vehicle data company HPI comes, the organisation says, as recent reports show that keyless entry has allowed an increase in car-theft: “With a piece of kit available online a thief can intercept the code sent out by its key and create an unlocking code for your car which allows them to gain access to it and drive off.”

FERNANDO GARCIA: Consumer director at HPI
FERNANDO GARCIA: Consumer director at HPI. Image: Newspress

Car thieves in South Africa are well award of the way to easy money.

Fernando Garcia, HPI’s consumer director, told Carman’s Corner in a media release:

“Car manufacturers take security seriously and issue software updates that can be performed by your local dealer or, in some cases wirelessly over the internet.

“It’s important to check if your car is subject to ra ecall that will cover not only security but also anti-theft upgrades.”

150 RECALLS EACH YEAR

In a typical year more than a million cars are affected by a recall and more than 150 recalls are issued. HPI has a recall-check service as part of its vehicle history check service.

“HPI car checks are essential for any person considering the purchase of a used vehicle and can protect the buyer from a fraudulent sale and other motoring scams that are becoming common.”


If there is a similar service in South Africa, let The Corner know and we’ll publish your details, too. email carman@iafrica.com


The check also covers registration plate changes, odometer reading, the number of  previous owners and search both the VIN and number plate against the police national computer for cars currently recorded as stolen or cloned.”

  • Research by Britain’s Royal Automobile Club car thefts in England and Wales have increased from 65 783 in 2013 to 85 688 in 2017.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s